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Kaban classification of hemifacial microsomia

The mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: a

Classification and treatment of hemifacial microsomi

  1. e treatment protocols based on the degree of osseous deficiency present in the body, ramus, and temporomandibular joint. Different mandibular..
  2. The aim of this paper is to report treatment effects of functional therapy in a growing patient affected by hemifacial microsomia (HM). According to Kaban's classification, the patient was classified as grade IIa as she presented all mandibular and temporomandibular joint components and a normal shaped, hypoplastic mandible
  3. 1.3 Classification The heterogeneity of hemifacial microsomia has led to several classifications of which the most important are SAT, an acronym for Skeletal, Auricular and Soft Tissue (David et al., 1987) and OMENS an acronym for Orbital, Mandibular, Ear, Nerve and Soft tissue (Vento et al., 1991)
  4. There are several classification systems for hemifacial microsomia, which include: OMENS, Pruzansky and Meurman. Management of hemifacial microsomia is centred on a disciplinary team to correct ocular, mandibular, ear, facial nerve and soft tissue issues over a prolonged period of staged treatments.. Definition of Hemifacial Microsomia
Surgical Care of the Hemifacial Microsomia Patient

The classification of hemifacial microsomia (HFM) aids in diagnosis, treatment planning, prognostic predictions and data evaluation. The aetiological and phenotypic heterogeneities of HFM, however, make its classification problematic The Kaban classification is a modification of the Pruzansky system, which characterizes the degree of mandibular involvement with particular attention to the ramus-condyle unit. The Kaban type I mandible has mild hypoplasia of the ramus-condyle unit; however, the temporomandibular joint functions normally Hemifacial microsomia also known as first and second brachial arch syndrome, oral-mandibular-auricular syndrome, lateral facial dysplasia, or oto-mandibular dysostosis is often a congenitally developed disorder.[6,7,8,9] Table 1 Signs and symptoms of hemifacial microsomia Table 2 Surgical procedure according to hemifacial microsomia type following the classification by Kaban, according to Liu et al, 2012 49 Surgical management of the mandible is essential, and mandible bone distraction has several advantages over costochondral graft Hemifacial microsomia is a congenital condition in which the tissues on one side of the face are underdeveloped. It primarily affects the ear, mouth and jaw areas, though it may also involve the eye, cheek, neck and other parts of the skull, as well as nerves and soft tissue. In 10 to 15 percent of cases, both sides of the face are affected.

Objective: To investigate the treatment modalities (Tx-Mods) for patients with unilateral hemifacial microsomia (UHFM) according to Pruzansky-Kaban types and growth stages. Methods: The samples. Hemifacial microsomia and Goldenhar syndrome pose unique challenges to the craniofacial surgeon. The O.M.E.N.S. classifcation provides a description of the craniofacial features. For the M of O.M.E.N.S. (the mandible), the Pruzansky-Kaban classifcation provides therapeutic guidelines for joint and face reconstruction The wide spectrum of anomalies associated with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) has made systematic and inclusive classification difficult. We propose a nosologic system In which each letter of the acronym O.M.E.N.S. Indicates one of the five major manifestations of HFM Hemifacial Microsomia Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is defined as a condition that involves an absence or underdevelopment of structures that arise from the first and second pharyngeal arches We thank Dr. Kaban et al. for their interest in our recent publication in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery entitled The Mandibular Deformity in Hemifacial Microsomia: A Reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban Classification. 1 We appreciate their criticisms of our work. It is essential for all of us to continue to be critical of.

Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is the second most common facial anomaly, with a broad spectrum of phenotypes. 1,2,3,4,5,6 Although it usually affects one side of the face, ears, mouth, and mandible, both sides are sometimes affected Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a congenital disorder that affects the development of the lower half of the face, most commonly the ears, the mouth and the mandible.It usually occurs on one side of the face, but both sides are sometimes affected. If severe, it may result in difficulties in breathing due to obstruction of the trachea—sometimes even requiring a tracheotomy

Hemifacial microsomia 1. Hemifacial Microsomia By Dr. Sulaiman Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2. Layout • Introduction • Pathogenesis • Classification • Management • Case Presentation 3. Definition • A congenital malformation in which there is deficiency in the amount of hard and soft tissues on one side of the face Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a craniofacial malformation that results in varying degrees of hypoplasia of the structures within the first and second branchial archs. 34,35,38,53,62,65,66,81,84,174,227 Congenital hypoplasia is generally unilateral, although bilateral (asymmetric) involvement occurs in 5% to 15% of patients. Most cases of this condition are sporadic, but there are rare.

In our department, the treatment for craniofacial microsomia has been based on the Kaban's modified classification. In type I, the management we use is orthopedic treatment to stimulate maxillary and mandibular growth. In type IIa and IIb we use distraction osteogenesis of the mandible and practice orthopedic treatment management at the same time The mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: A reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban classification. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014; 133:174e-81e. [Google Scholar] 11. Kearns GJ, Padwa BL, Kaban BL. Craniofacial microsomia: The disorder and it's surgical management. In: Booth PW, Schendel SA, editors Hemifacial microsomia often refers to craniofacial microsomia with maxillary or mandibular hypoplasia. People with hemifacial microsomia and noncancerous (benign) growths in the eye called epibulbar dermoids may be said to have Goldenhar syndrome or oculoauricular dysplasia Hemifacial microsomia is variable with respect to the degree of the deformity it presents, thus, treatment varies. Mild degrees of the condition are usually treated adequately by waiting until adolescence, when definitive surgical correction of any skeletal or soft tissue asymmetry can be dealt with. Some mild and moderate cases may benefit from orthodontic functional appliance therapy during.

Managing Hemifacial Microsomia with Total Custom TMJ

Hemifacial microsomia is the second most common congenital defect of the head and neck, second only to cleft lip/cleft palate, with an incidence of 1 in 3500 to 1 in 4000. The Pruzanksky and Kaban classification is commonly used to assess the mandible and is broken down into three grades with several subtypes that help delineate the. Classifications should be u... A New Classification Based on the Kaban's Modification for Surgical Management of Craniofacial Microsomia - Jose Rolando Prada Madrid, Giovanni Montealegre, Viviana Gomez, 201 Distribution of the Pruzansky-Kaban types and side involvement in patients with unilateral hemifacial microsomia Unilateral type (n = 215) Pruzansky-Kaban classification Side involvement Type p-value Right side Left side p-value I 114 (53.0) 65 49 IIa 40 (18.6) < 0.001*** 22 18-IIb 53 (24.7) 23 30 III 8 (3.7) 3 5 Sum 215 113 (52.6) 102 (47. The Kaban modification of the Pruzansky classification (KPC) is based on the severity of the mandibular deformity in Hemifacial Microsomia(HFM) as assessed by clinical exam and plain x-ray. Despite advances in medical imaging, the KPC continues to be the benchmark for the classification of HFM SP. The mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: a reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban classification. Plastic and reconstructive surgery. 2014;133(2):174e-81e. 9.Kim Seow W, Urban S, Vafaie N, Shusterman S. Mor-phometric analysis of the primary and permanent denti-tions in hemifacial microsomia: a controlled study. Journa

27: Treacher Collins Syndrome: Evaluation and Treatment

The Mandibular Deformity in Hemifacial Microsomia: A

(PDF) A New Classification Based on the Kaban's

correspond to Type IIB of hemifacial microsomia according to the classification of Pruzansky-Kaban [21] shown in Table 1. Nevertheless, the patient could function with both temporomandibular joints and did not complain of any deficiency in chewing. Vertebral anomalies in HFM are most common in th classification was later modified by Kaban and colleagues7 and is replicated with a minor modification in nomenclature, in the mandibular portion of the Hemifacial microsomia is known for its wide spectrum and variation that ranges from the mild forms, with only preauricular skin tags, to moderate forms, whic

Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) or first & second brachial arch syndrome is an asymmetric craniofacial malformation which results in hypoplasia of the components of the first and second branchial arches: maxilla, mandible, external and middle ear, facial and trigeminal nerves, muscles of mastication, and overlying soft tissue. 2nd M/C birth defect of the face (after cleft lip and cleft palate Hemifacial microsomia (HFM), also known as unilateral otomandibular dysostosis or lateral facial dysplasia, is an asymmetrical, congenital malformation of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and the second most common craniofacial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. [1] Patients present with unilateral hypoplasia of the ear, facial skeleton. REFERENCES 1. Wink JD, Goldstein JA, Paliga JT, Taylor JA, Bartlett SP. The mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: A reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban classification. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014;133:174e-181e. 2. Kaban LB, Mulliken JB, Murray JE. Three-dimensional approach to analysis and treatment of hemifacial microsomia Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a branchial arch syndrome and the second most common craniofacial birth defect after cleft lip and palate. This syndrome involves the facial skeleton and ear. The most important goal in treatment of HFM is to improve facial symmetry. Traditionally, segment repositioning and costochondral graft were used for the correction of mandibular asymmetry but recently.

Early Orthopaedic Treatment of Hemifacial Microsomi

Pruzansky-Kaban classification was applied, high individual variability of the mandibular morphology still existed within the types. Therefore, individualized analyses and treatment plans for CFM patients are highly recommended. Keywords Craniofacial microsomia. Hemifacial microsomia . Mandibular asymmetry. Facial asymmetry. Cone-beam. This is felt to represent the mildest form of hemifacial microsomia 2-3. Classification of Microtia . Microtia is graded in accordance with the number of vestigal ear structures present. Some surgeons and research articles refer to this as grades of microtia. Anotia: complete absence of the external ear Kaban et al. added a subdivision of type II, identifying type IIa as a ramus with abnormal size and shape and type IIb as a ramus and TMJ with abnormal size, shape, and function. This classification system may be the most useful to the surgeon in the preoperative evaluation because of its simplicity and inclusion of the TMJ anatomy and function

Objective: To investigate the distribution and phenotypes of hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and its association with other anomalies. Methods: This study included 249 Korean patients with HFM, whose charts, photographs, radiographs, and/or computed tomography scans acquired during 1998-2018 were available from Seoul National University Hospital and Dental Hospital Background Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) features hypoplasia and asymmetry in skeletal as well as soft tissue, and correction of the deformity is difficult in terms of aesthetic outcome. The purpose of this study is to examine the validity of an integrated treatment protocol for correction of this facial deformity. Patients and methods A retrospective study was performed on adult HFM patients. Hemifacial microsomia is the second most common facial birth disorder after cleft lip and palate, 34 with a prevalence of one in 3500 to 5600 live births. 35,36 Accepting these data, the number of patients in the studies was low. Major centers included less than 30 patients with hemifacial microsomia in their series (Table 1) Hemifacial Microsomia - Facial Palsy UK. There are several classification systems for hemifacial microsomia, which include: OMENS, Pruzansky and Meurman. Management of hemifacial microsomia is centred on a disciplinary team to correct ocular, mandibular, ear, facial nerve and soft tissue issues over a prolonged period of staged treatments

Treatment modalities for Korean patients with unilateral hemifacial microsomia according to Pruzansky-Kaban types and growth stages. 1 Coronavirus: Find the latest articles and preprint AB - Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a congenital disorder marked by facial asymmetry. Whether facial asymmetry accounts for asymmetrical dental development is unknown. There are few data on dental development relative to mandibular development or severity of HFM, or on development over time most accurate clinical classification frame is, of course, the OMENS system, developed by Vento et al, thanks to a 1991 study on 154 patients affected with HFM. It focuses on each of the five Hemifacial Microsomia anatomic cases, according to Dysformia severity on a scale from 0 to 3. Each case corresponds to a letter o Hemifacial microsomia: management of the vertical ramus compartment . 8 0 0 0

Murray JE, Kaban LB, Mulliken JB (1984) Analysis and treatment of hemifacial microsomia. Plast Reconstr Surg 74: 186-199. Lauritzen C, Munro IR, Ross RB (1985) Classification and treatment of hemifacial microsomia The OMENS classification is used to describe the anomalies of the orbit, mandible, ear, facial nerve and the soft tissues, whereby the Pruzansky‐Kaban score is used to determine the severity of the mandibular hypoplasia. 16 Another classification system is the SAT scale and is used to describe the mandibular, auricular and soft‐tissue. Keogh IJ, Troulis MJ, Monroy AA, Eavey RD, Kaban LB. Isolated microtia as a marker for unsuspected hemifacial microsomia. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007 Oct;133(10):997-1001. Rahbar R, Robson CD, Mulliken JB, Schwartz L, Dicanzio J, Kenna MA, McGill TJ, Healy GB Microtia is a congenital deformity where the pinna (external ear) is underdeveloped. A completely undeveloped pinna is referred to as anotia.Because microtia and anotia have the same origin, it can be referred to as microtia-anotia. Microtia can be unilateral (one side only) or bilateral (affecting both sides) Hemifacial macrosomia (HFM) is the second most common facial congenital anomaly. Deficiency of hard and soft tissue on one side of the face is its obvious clinical finding, which can cause facial asymmetry. Hemifacial microsomia is described in three grades of severity, although grade II has two subgroups (mild and severe). Many anomalies can be misdiagnosed with different grades of Hemifacial.

In categorizing our patient in this classification system, the patient presented with 2 of their 3 minimal diagnostic criteria including unilateral preauricular appendages and hemifacial microsomia, classifying our patient as group 2u.In addition our patient also presented with additional clinical features consisting of an orofacial cleft, dermoids, brain anomaly, delay of motor and speech. Discussion. Hemifacial microsomia is a variable and asymmetric craniofacial malformation. Of all causes of asymmetry, it is the most unpredictable and widely variable in its expression and response to growth modification Hemifacial microsomia (HM) is a congenital craniofacial malformation caused by hypoplasia of anatomical structures deriving from the first and second branchial arches. As a result, HM involves facial skeleton, soft tissues, ear, and cranial nerves, thus resulting in the absence or insufficiency of these components [1] Craniofacial microsomia is a congenital facial malformation that commonly results in a decrease in the size of one or both sides of the mandible. The Pruzansky classification (1) and its 1998 modification by Kaban et al (2) is how plastic surgeons have classified and communicated the mandibular deformity in these patients almost universally. Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is the most common craniofacial anomaly after cleft lip and cleft palate; this deformity primarily involves the facial skeleton and ear, with either underdevelopment or absence of both components. In patients with HFM, the management of the asymmetries requires a series of treatment phases that focus on their interception and correction, such as distraction.

Hemifacial microsomia

Current research about hemifacial microsomia (HFM) patients after distraction osteogenesis (DO) most emphasize the morphologic changes. This case report shows the outcome of DO on the upper airway of a HFM patient with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) based on the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). An 11-year-old boy was diagnosed as HFM with OSA, and underwent unilateral DO Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is the second most common facial birth defect after cleft lip and palate. The estimated incidence is of 1 of every 4000 to 5600 live births. The aetiology and pathogenesis of hemifacial microsomia are still unknown Three-Dimensional Approach To Analysis and Treatment of Hemifacial Microsomia Leonard B. Kaban John B. Mulliken Joseph E. Murray PDF Published 1981-04-01 Issue Vol 18 No 2 (1981): April 1981 Section Articles (c) The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.

Hemifacial Microsomia - Illustrations and Explanation

A comparison of two classification systems for hemifacial

The Pruzansky-Kaban classification of Hemifacial microsomia(15) describes 3 mandibular types based on the status of the condyle-ramus-glenoid fossa unit: type I (temporomandibular joint and ramus are well formed but smaller than normal), type II (temporomandibular joint, ramus, and glenoid fossa are hypoplastic and malformed, and sometime Hemifacial microsomia. Hemifacial microsomia ( HFM ) is the second most common congenital facial anomaly after cleft lip/palate. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Goldenhar syndrome has been described as a variant of HFM, in which vertebral anomalies and epibulbar dermoids were present 23. Kearns GJ, Padwa BL, Mulliken JB, Kaban LB. Progression of facial asymmetry in hemifacial-microsomia. Plast Reconstr Surg 2000; 105: 492-8. 24. Shetye PR, Grayson BH, Mackool RJ, McCarthy JG. Long-term stability and growth following unilateral mandibular distraction in growing children with craniofacial microsomia. Plast Reconstr Surg 2006. Goldenhar syndrome, hemifacial microsomia or aur-iculo-oculo-vertebral spectrum. Diagnostic criteria apnoea, adenotonsillectomy (ATE) may be the treat-It is advised to use the diagnostic criteria for craniofacial microsomia developed by the ICHOM Craniofacial Microsomia group. CFM is defined by: 2 major criteria, or 1 major þ 1 minor criteria, o Hemifacial microsomia is a subset of craniofacial microsomia. It is a spectrum of undergrowth conditions or malformations related to the craniofacial skeleton. They occur in 1 in 3,000 to 25,000 live births, second only to the incidence of cleft lip and palate

Hemifacial Microsomia - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

The Kaban modification of the Pruzansky classification (KPC) is based on the severity of the mandibular deformity in Hemifacial Microsomia(HFM) as assessed by clinical exam and plain x-ray. Despite advances in medical imaging, the KPC continues to be the benchmark for the classification of HF Mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: a reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban classification. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2014 Oct; 134(4):657e-658e. View abstract; Change in Mandibular Position in Patients With Syndromic Craniosynostosis After Midfacial Advancement With Distraction Osteogenesis. Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2015 09; 52(5):506-11 hemifacial microsomia, oculoauricularvertebral syndrome Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) or craniofacial microsomia is the second most common congenital facial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. The disorder manifests as malformations of the face in the anatomic distribution of the first and second branchial arches, but extracranial findings are. [8] E.M.Ongkosuwito,J.vanVooren,J.W.vanNecketal., Changes of mandibular ramal height, during growth in unilateral hemifacial microsomia patients and unaecte

An Interdisciplinary Management of Severe Facial Asymmetry

Hemifacial Microsomia

Hemifacial Microsomia is part of a group of disorders collectively known as craniofacial microsomia. It constitutes the most common facial birth defect after cleft lip and palate The exact cause of Hemifacial Microsomia and its contributing risk factors are unknown OMENS classification of craniofacial microsomia was proposed by Vento et al. in 1991. Five major areas of involvement in craniofacial microsomia go by the pneumonic: O-orbital, M-mandibular, E-ear, N-facial nerve, and S-soft tissue

Hemifacial Microsomia Children's Hospital of Philadelphi

Hemifacial microsomia is the second most common facial birth defect after cleft lip and cleft palate. It occurs in approximately one in 3500-4000 live births. In children with HFM, part of one side of the face is small or underdeveloped. It usually affects the ear, mouth and jaw - and sometimes also the eye, cheek and neck Based on longitudinal observation of more than 80 patients, we concluded that mandibular hypoplasia is the earliest skeletal manifestation of hemifacial microsomia. The clinical defect becomes worse with time as a result of continued asymmetric growth and progressive secondary deformation of the midface. We hypothesize that midface growth is restricted by the hypoplastic mandible Hemifacial Microsomia from childhood to adolescence, placing special emphasis on the approach of the several classifications that try to specify the anomalies present in the HFM by atten-ding to the dysmorphologies in an isolated way (for example, only ear or jaw.), Or later modified by Mulliken and Kaban (1987). Other classi Various classifications have been developed to grade the degrees of hemifacial microsomia. Pruzansky described ear and mandible deformities into grades I to III. This case is an example of a Pruzansky IIb. 3D printing used in other walks of life is now used for modelling purposes prior to surgery. These are produced from the raw CT dataset Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is associated with a difficult airway. We hypothesized that a difficult intubation would be predicted by radiographic evaluation of the severity of mandibular hypoplasia. A retrospective review of anaesthetic and surgical records of 102 children with HFM from 1986 to 1996 was conducted for radiographic classification of mandibular hypoplasia and degree of difficulty.

Numerous schemes have been developed to classify this spectrum. One of the most recent classification systems, the OMENS system, scores five clinical manifestations of hemifacial microsomia according to dysmorphic severity on a scale from 0 to 3: orbital asymmetry, mandibular hypoplasia, ear deformity, nerve dysfunction, and soft-tissue deficiency Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a congenital craniofacial malformation that features hypoplasia and asymmetry in skeletal tissue as well as in soft tissue [].As HFM involves the structure of the first and second pharyngeal arches, it presents across a wide area, which includes the maxilla, mandible, external ear, middle ear ossicles, facial and trigeminal nerves, temporal bone, and muscles of. Hemifacial microsomia is a congenital condition where one side of the face is underdeveloped with the eyes, ears, cheekbone and mandible being affected. The lower half of the face is affected the most by this condition. Underdevelopment of the mandible includes underdevelopment of the TM joint. Hemifacial microsomia always results in TMJ disorders Computer guided temporomandibular joint reconstruction of Kaban III hemifacial microsomia with anotia: A case report Highlights•Localization of TMJ graft position represents a true dilemma in Kaban III hemifacial microsomia with anotia.•Computer guided soft tissue guide eliminates the need of extended skin incisions with excessive dissection.•Maxillomandibular/zygomatic complex model. Anesthesia Considerations for Patients with Hemifacial Microsomia. 12/29/2020. Hemifacial microsomia is a congenital disease that can result in abnormal structural changes in the lower half of the face, most commonly the ears, mouth, and mandible. If severe, this condition can compromise the trachea and result in difficulties breathing

(PDF) Hemifacial Microsomia - ResearchGat

Mandibular deformity in hemifacial microsomia: a reassessment of the Pruzansky and Kaban classification. Leonard B. Kaban, Bonnie L. Padwa, John B. Mulliken The importance of the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with hemifacial microsomia slant, the early treatment, guide of eruption and the use orthopedics maxillary pre and post surgery, as well as the use of osteogenic distraction offer the ideal treatment in patients with hemifacial microsomia. Palabras clave: Microsomía hemifacial características e indicaciones de la microsomia hemifacial by jose_collazos_4 Patient:Forty patients with hemifacial microsomia. Result: Mandibular hypoplasia and auricular abnor-malities were the most common clinical manifestations, present in 39 patients (97%) and 38 patients (95%), re-spectively. Conductive hearing loss was noted in 35 patients (86%) and sensorineural hearing loss in 4 pa-tients (10%)

Hemifacial microsomia: management of the vertical ramus

Hemifacial microsomia is a rare dentofacial anomaly which is regarded as a separate entity to Goldenhar syndrome and primarily affects the structures of the first branchial arch. It has a heterogeneous aetiology and tends to occur sporadically, though positive family histories have been reported Hemifacial microsomia is the second most common developmental craniofacial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. Diagnostic imaging is important for presurgical evaluation of patients with this anomaly; however the broad spectrum of abnormalies encountered in patients with hemifacial microsomia can be confusing [2] Hemifacial means one side of the face Hemifacial microsomia (also known as craniofacial microsomia, oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, or oculoauricular dysplasia) is a generic term covering many variants, such as Goldenhar syndrome, facio-auriculo vertebral syndrome, branchial arch syndrome, otomandibular dysostosis and lateral facial dysplasi

Craniofacial Microsomia and Principles of Craniofacial

Growth observation and orthodontic treatment of a hemifacial microsomia patient treated with distraction osteogenesis Pruzansky classified HFM into three types based on the mandibular deformity, and Kaban et al. 4 modified the classification system Craniofacial microsomia is a unique clinical presentation of 1 st and 2 nd arch syndrome with asymmetrical craniofacial development along with conductive hearing loss. It involves the underdevelopment of the structures of the first and second pharyngeal arches: Maxilla, mandible, external and middle ear, facial and trigeminal nerves, muscles of mastication and overlying soft tissue Hemifacial microsomia: Use of the OMENS-Plus classification at the Royal Children's Hospital of Melbourne. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , 111, 1011-1018. Crossref Medline Google Schola Bennun RD, Mulliken JB, Kaban LB, Murray JE: Microtia: a microform of hemifacial microsomia. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985, 76 (6): 859-865. 10.1097/00006534-198512000-00010. CAS Article PubMed Google Scholar 6. Rollnick BR, Kaye CI: Hemifacial microsomia and variants: pedigree data

4 Craniofacial Microsomia | Plastic Surgery KeyAdult patient with hemifacial microsomia treated with